So Many Stories to Tell…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So Many Stories to Tell…

Ok, so it is no secret that our libraries house lots of stories.   Many inspire us; spur our imaginations.  Some transport us to another place and time.  Others are fascinating biographies of television personalities, rock stars, and politicians.  With a collection of over 656,000 titles - we have stories! 

Not only do we find them lining our physical and virtual shelves, we discover them every day amidst our dedicated staff, volunteers, board members, and library friends who have their own unique reasons for being involved and loving libraries.  And ultimately there is you - our cardholders.  In fact, there are more than 209,000 of you.  That’s half our population in York County! 

The stories you tell us are incredible.  They are stories of how you got found a job, learned how to read, improved your health; learned something that changed your life from our materials, resources, or programs.  Your successes truly inspire us.

As we celebrate National Library Week, April 13 – 19, we hope to hear even more of your stories.  And so does the American Library Association.  Follow this link to learn how.

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Stripes of All Types

 

 

Susan Stockdale’s inspiration for writing the children’s book Stripes of All Types came while visiting a museum exhibition of poison dart frogs.  She learned that their colorful stripes warn predators that they are toxic and to stay away.  “While gazing at the frogs, I began thinking about other animals that have stripes and why they have them - and the idea for Stripes of All Types was born,” says Stockdale who is this year’s featured author for the Pennsylvania One Book Every Young Child program.  In its 9th year, the initiative highlights the importance of early literacy development in preschoolers, ages 3 – 6 years. 

At York County Libraries, we are honored to be one of the stops on her statewide tour. Stockdale is visiting our Martin Library location on Wednesday, April 9 to read to children and their parents/caregivers at 1:30 p.m. in the quiet reading room.   Everyone is welcome to attend this free program.  We are looking forward to hearing this award-winning author read the fun rhyming verses she wrote to describe what each striped animal does in its natural habitat.  Words like “Propped on a log, poised on a leaf. Scaling a ridge, and scouting a reef,” will certainly introduce kids to some new verbs and to diverse animal environments. 

Come join us!

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Libraries Love LEGOs

Libraries Love LEGOs

By Nancy Duncan

…and the kids do too.  That was evident at Red Land Community Library’s first meeting of LEGO Club in July. There were 33 kids there, most between grades 1 to 5 and mostly male. There was a scattering of girls, but it definitely was a male crowd.

Red Land was fortunate to have all of their LEGOs donated from several patrons, so there were plenty for everyone. It was one of the easiest programs I was ever a part of. All I had to do was issue a challenge and then get out of the way as the kids imagination took over. At 10 minutes before our time was up, I said that it was time to clean up, and miraculously, they did!

The popularity of LEGO Clubs in libraries and as after-school programs derives from the push for more STEM knowledge in children. STEM stands for Science, Technology, Engineering and Math. The United States is lagging behind other countries when it comes to careers in these fields and schools are now attempting to introduce more children to these subjects.

Several libraries in York County have LEGO Clubs. Every Monday at 5:00 p.m. Martin Library has one, Dillsburg has one on the first Thursday of the month at 6 p.m., Collinsville has LEGO Maniac one Saturday a month, and Dover has a new one meeting on the 2nd Wednesday of each month at 4:30 p.m.  Check the Events calendar on the York County Libraries web page for a full listing.

Hands-on activities have the potential to engage children in ways that traditional teaching methods don’t. It’s all about demonstrating to kids that math and science can be practical but also fun.

There was a lot of fun in evidence at Red Land’s LEGO Club.

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