Author Interview: Terry Border

Author Interview: Terry Border

By Ruth Collins

Terry Border started what he likes to call his Bent Objects Project in 2006. Mr. Border’s work usually involves adding wire to everyday objects, enabling them to becoming living characters with a story to tell.  He has published three books Bent Objects: The Secret Life of Everyday Things, Bent Object of My Affection: The Twists and Turns of Love, and Peanut Butter & Cupcake.  A fourth book is scheduled to be released in July 2015.  I recently had the privilege of asking Mr. Border some questions about his work.    

Did you ever think you would become an author?

Not really, although it was always in the back of my mind. I've now finished my second children's book with 2 more on the horizon. My books are so visually oriented that I have a hard time calling myself an author, but I guess I am. 

How does your creative process go?

I start with an object and what the object makes me think of. Then it's all about how to show what I'm thinking to the viewer.

Who is your hero/inspiration?

Alexander Calder. His early wire and object works are my favorite. There are YouTube videos of him performing his circus that are particularly interesting.

What is your greatest achievement? 

I hope it's still to come. 

What is/was your favorite Bent Object project? 

It's difficult to pick a favorite. If I had to I suppose it would be Belated, an image of an egg coming home on Mother's Day. It's one people don't know whether to laugh or cry about.

If you were an animal in a zoo what would you be?

One of those gibbons with the long arms swinging like crazy in the trees. 

What’s your favorite fruit?

I eat at least one banana a day.

Do you ride roller coasters?

I do, but as I've gotten older I don't have patience for waiting in long lines.

Who’s your favorite villain of all time?

I'm not sure if he's my favorite, but the scariest for me is the child snatcher in Chitty Chitty Bang Bang movie. He gave me a few nightmares as a kid. *shivers

What did you want to be when you grew up?

An inventor and I guess I kind of am. :)

Where do you see yourself in 10 years?

Hopefully I'm doing what I'm doing but 10 years older. I'd like to make things until I don't wake up in the morning.

What are you currently working on?

I'm working on the story for my 3rd children's book. It's about the first day of school for lots of food-kids. 

I remember that I was excited and nervous, and I'm trying to show that sort of feeling.

What additional books would you recommend?

For picture books- any book by Slinkachu. He was making tiny people into art before most others.

I grew up loving Calvin & Hobbes and The Farside.

I'm a big fan of Douglas Adams’ work.

Innocents Abroad by Mark Twain is beyond awesome.

Most things by David Sedaris are good, especially his early short stories. 

As far as "more serious" works go, I actually love Moby Dick. Its humor surprised me.

What are you currently reading? 

Life Itself by Roger Ebert; I highly, highly recommend it.

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I Resolve...

I Resolve...

According to daysoftheyear.com we have quite a few “holidays” in January. 

The twelfth for instance is National Marzipan Day.  What exactly is marzipan?  Well, it’s like an edible clay for bakers made primarily from almonds.  Sometimes it’s used as a cake ingredient or an icing.  Some bakers are quite creative and cutesy with it.

The official Ditch New Year’s Resolutions Day is January 17th.  Is that gym membership really worth it for 17 days?  This year my New Year’s resolution is simple - to finish a ChapStick.  Hopefully I can keep that sucker out of the laundry long enough to last till the seventeenth.  What does a ChapStick tube even look like empty?  Is there a prize at the bottom? 

January 30th will be Inane Answering Message Day.  Something like this maybe.  One of my first cell phone voicemails was me going “Hello...yeah...I’m not here right now.  Leave me a message.”  My friend had an identical one and I still fell for it…every time. 

Coming up in February we have Lame Duck Day, Gumdrop Day, and Curling is Cool Day.  Now if you’ll excuse me I have got to go get a gorilla suit for January 31st. 

What are your New Year’s resolutions?  Have you ever successfully kept a resolution for the whole year? 

-Ruth Collins

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Game On!

Game On!

When you think about your local public library you probably think of shelves from the floor to the ceiling full of books. When I think about my public library I think of an amazing place that is always changing and growing with the times. I think about grabbing that new James Patterson book while browsing new DVD releases. More importantly I think about all the newly released video games that Martin Library has just purchased.

Since the fall of renting stores like Blockbuster, the average gamer has been left with no options to “try before I buy” new video games. We purchase all types of games from Minecraft to NBA 2K 14. Martin Library has even launched weekly gaming clubs for kids.

Did you know that you can rent a game for a week for only $2 dollars? So the next time you’re downtown, don’t forget to stop into Martin Library to have a look at our growing collection that now includes Xbox One and PlayStation 4!

Mike Velasco

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Is Your Teen Road Ready?

 

Is Your Teen Road Ready?

Learning the rules of the road can be a bit overwhelming for future drivers.  Thanks to an in-kind grant from Driving-Tests.org, York County Libraries now offers access to free online practice tests for the Pennsylvania Driving Permit exam.  

The resource offers practice tests for both motorcycle and car exams. In addition, users can practice their skills on recognizing road signs and understanding PA limits and signs.  Also available is the complete PA Driver’s Manual.

                           …The best part?  The experience is totally ad-free, so aspiring motorists can concentrate on their upcoming exam.

The program is offered by Driving-Tests.org as part of their Corporate Social Responsibility mission and is available only to a limited number of U.S. libraries. York County Libraries are proud to present this additional resource to our York community.

 

By Elyse Pollick

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Tough Topics in Young Adult Literature

Tough Topics in Young Adult Literature

Recently, I had the pleasure to talk to Karen Jensen from the Teen Librarian Toolbox  about the topics that are cropping up in teen literature that some people may think are too difficult or inappropriate for teens to handle. Karen really stressed that we think critically about this literature and the importance and impact it could make in a teen’s life. She also brought up the point that “Teens today live in a world overshadowed by the events of 9/11” and that “Schools today have duck and cover lock down drills where they practice what to do if a shooter comes into their school.” This is a “normal” part of a teenagers life, and this is in addition to stress that they may handle at home, violence that they be exposed to (both sexual and physical) and mental and health issues that they may have to handle. In this case, is it any wonder that teen literature is seeing an emergence of more difficult subject matter? And if teens have to face this reality every day, then are we really qualified to deny them a book that may help them cope in some way?

I strongly urge that the next time you see a book that may contain some difficult subject matter on the Young Adult shelves, that instead of asking why that subject is being discussed, instead ask how it may possibly assist a teen and if this is a subject that they actively have to handle. The problem in this situation is not the book, but rather the fact that a young adult has to handle these subjects in the first place. Some great books with difficult subjects in them specifically for teens and available at your library are Crank by Ellen Hopkins, Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson, The Ballads of Suburbia by Stephanie Kuehnert, Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher and Between Shades of Gray by Ruta Sepetys, in addition to many other titles. For more suggestions, you can check out Karen Jensen’s blog  or ask your local librarian! Keep reading and supporting the freedom to read!

By Dawn States

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